fagbarbie:

*doesn’t have internet access for a week*

image

(via gnarly)



aureat:

some people have sex in the kitchen

i eat in my bed

(via gnarly)


When I try to seduce someone with my body language

whatshouldbetchescallme:

Expectation

image

Reality

imageimageimage


empressque3n:

she’s literally jesus with mascara and I love it 

(via takealookatyourlife)


vegan-vulcan:

"I Want My Food To Cook Thoroughly But I’m Also Really Fucking Hungry": a memoir

and the bestselling companion novel, “The Girl Who Burned Her Mouth Because She Was Too Damn Hungry To Wait For Her Fucking Potatoes To Cool Down”

(via fuckyeahfatvegans)


s-c-i-guy:

Researchers discover protein’s ability to inhibit HIV release
A family of proteins that promotes virus entry into cells also has the ability to block the release of HIV and other viruses, University of Missouri researchers have found.

"This is a surprising finding that provides new insights into our understanding of not only HIV infection, but also that of Ebola and other viruses," said Shan-Lu Liu, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor in the MU School of Medicine’s Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology.
The study was recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Liu, the corresponding author of the study, is also an investigator with the Christopher S. Bond Life Sciences Center at MU.
According to estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one million Americans currently are living with AIDS. AIDS, which stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, is a condition characterized by progressive failure of the immune system. It is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).
When HIV-1 or any virus infects a cell, it replicates and spreads to other cells. One type of cellular protein—T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain, or TIM-1—has previously been shown to promote entry of some highly pathogenic viruses into host cells. Now, the MU researchers have found that the same protein possesses a unique ability to block the release of HIV-1 and Ebola virus.
read more

s-c-i-guy:

Researchers discover protein’s ability to inhibit HIV release

A family of proteins that promotes virus entry into cells also has the ability to block the release of HIV and other viruses, University of Missouri researchers have found.

"This is a surprising finding that provides new insights into our understanding of not only HIV infection, but also that of Ebola and other viruses," said Shan-Lu Liu, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor in the MU School of Medicine’s Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology.

The study was recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Liu, the corresponding author of the study, is also an investigator with the Christopher S. Bond Life Sciences Center at MU.

According to estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one million Americans currently are living with AIDS. AIDS, which stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, is a condition characterized by progressive failure of the immune system. It is caused by the type 1 (HIV-1).

When HIV-1 or any virus infects a cell, it replicates and spreads to other cells. One type of cellular protein—T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain, or TIM-1—has previously been shown to promote entry of some highly pathogenic viruses into host cells. Now, the MU researchers have found that the same protein possesses a unique ability to block the release of HIV-1 and Ebola virus.

read more

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)